Playing (Less) Hurt


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Please click here for a high resolution image for media._________________________

Janet Horvath won the gold medal in the Independant Publisher (I.P.P.Y.) Awards 2009! 
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Find Janet at the Minnesota Orchestra! Visit the Minnesota Orchestra website for more information.
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Let’s talk about something scary, something musicians are even more reticent to talk about than overuse injury. Hearing loss is on the rise and is a danger to all of us. Read Janet Horvath's white paper on hearing loss for more information.
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Janet Horvath now has a regular column on Interlude HK a classical music online magazine. Her articles range from health issues relevant to professional and student musicians as well as humorous behind-the-scenes- stories about life as a musician. These articles are of interest to all musicians, giving excellent advice on strategies to deal with existing injuries as well as how to avoid injury, and gives an insiders view of all things music!

www.interlude.hk
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Janet Horvath's article on "Posture Pointers" appears in a 2006 issue of Strings Magazine. This article is an excellent overview of the all-important issue of posture and how it relates to tension and injury. Ms. Horvath discusses "Risky Postures," "Tension" and its relationship to posture, "Natural" postures, as well as other points related to appropriate posture for performing musicians.
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When you hear the words "Mahler's Fifth," you probably think "great music." Janet Horvath wants you to think "phenomenal athleticism." Horvath, associate principal cellist of the Minnesota Orchestra and a pioneer in performing arts medicine, has been on a mission to get musicians, instructors and management to realize that playing any instrument is physically demanding. (Interview by Chrys Wu)

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"If you're an orchestral musician you could be at serious risk of long-term hearing damage. Janet Horvath looks at some simple and effective solutions."The Strad (December 2004)

Sunday
Aug012010

An Injury Prevention Guide for Musicians

How can musicians express themselves and recreate the great masterworks with ease, passion  and expressivness and yet avoid injury in the process? Musicians face many challenges: a highly competitive environment, performance anxiety, demanding repertoire, years of solitary practice, and awkward postures. The hectic pace of rehearsals and performances when added to the mix often results in the very real risk of physical pain and injury.

“Playing (Less) Hurt” is a readable and comprehensive guide and reference for all concerned with avoiding pain in musical work: professional and amateur musicians, teachers and students and doctors and therapists. This book is essential for all musicians. String, keyboard, percussion, harp, brass and wind players will play better and feel better. This information is pertinent for musicians of any genre.
Sunday
Aug012010

Subjects included in the book

• WHY IT MAY HURT TO PLAY 
• INJURY SUSCEPTIBILITY QUIZ 
• RISK FACTORS AND DANGER SIGNALS
• HEARING PROTECTION
• BACK, DISC, ARM AND SHOULDER PROBLEMS
10 ONSTAGE TRICKS 
• TMJ, TEETH, LARYNX AND JOINT LAXITY 
• STRETCHING AND STRENGTHENING 
• REHABILITATION AND WORK HARDENING 
• MUSICIAN’S SURVIVAL KIT 
10 DO’S AND 10 DON’TS 
• TOO MUCH, TOO SOON
• TEACHER'S GUIDLINES
• INSTRUMENT MODIFICATIONS   
• GUIDE TO SAFE PRACTICING
• RESOURCES
Sunday
Aug012010

Janet Horvath

Janet Horvath, associate principal cello of the Minnesota Orchestra for more than three decades, is a soloist, chamber musician, writer and advocate of injury prevention. A trail-blazer in speaking and writing openly about the physical stresses experienced by musicians, Horvath has contributed importantly to improvements in working conditions and in awareness for musicians' work-related ailments and their prevention.

“Playing (less) Hurt” is the culmination of 25 years of lecturing and teaching in the field of Performing Arts Medicine.

(For a more detailed bio, click here.)